FAQ: Why Were The Jews Who Escaped Exile In Great Reproach And Distress In The Book Of Nehemiah?

What is the significance of the book of Nehemiah?

The book of Nehemiah records an important time period in Jewish history, which included the rebuilding of the city of Jerusalem as well as the rebuilding of the spiritual lives of the Jews who had returned from captivity.

Who are the remnant in Nehemiah?

The post-exilic biblical literature (Ezra–Nehemiah, Haggai and Zechariah) consistently refers to the Jews who have returned from the Babylonian captivity as the remnant.

Why is your face sad since you are not sick this can only be sadness of the heart who said to whom?

Nehemiah 2:2 Therefore the king said to me, “Why is your face sad, since you are not sick? This is nothing but sorrow of heart.” So I became dreadfully.

Why did Nehemiah rebuild the wall of Jerusalem?

God instructed Nehemiah to build a wall around Jerusalem to protect its citizens from enemy attack. You see, God is NOT against building walls! And the Old Testament book of Nehemiah records how Nehemiah completed that massive project in record time — just 52 days.

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What can we learn from the book of Nehemiah?

One of the powerful messages of Nehemiah is how much you can accomplish when you align yourself with the will and plan of God. Nehemiah and his followers do what seems to be the impossible because they are doing what God has called them to do. You don’t have to rebuild a wall to do the will of God.

What is the main theme of Nehemiah?

Leadership is undoubtedly a significant theme found throughout the book of Nehemiah. With- out the leadership of Nehemiah, the city of Jerusalem and its walls could not have been rebuilt and the people of Israel could not have experienced spiritual renewal.

What angered the prophet Micah?

What angered the prophet Micah? Babylon conquered Judah. How did Judah become part of Babylon? So he could destroy Ninevah.

What is God’s remnant?

God’s remnant are those who acknowledge God in all their ways, even when their ways sometimes do not please God. They are the ones who always confess their sins to God while believing He is always faithful and just to forgive them of their sins and to cleanse them from all unrighteousness.

Who opposed Nehemiah?

Nehemiah and his builders, the Jews, vigorously hurried the work, while Sanballat and his associates organized their forces to fight against Jerusalem. Nehemiah prepared to meet the opposition and continued the work on the walls.

What did Nehemiah do when he first arrived in Jerusalem?

Distressed at news of the desolate condition of Jerusalem, Nehemiah obtained permission from Artaxerxes to journey to Palestine to help rebuild its ruined structures. He was provided with an escort and with documents that guaranteed the assistance of Judah’s Persian officials.

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Who did Nehemiah refer to as a servant of the Lord?

In Nehemiah 1:1-11, Nehemiah hears of the state of Jerusalem, its walls, and the temple. His response to this news is to pray. He refers to himself as God’s servant, and he dedicates himself to leading God’s people as His servant. He has a clear recognition of a specific need.

When did the Israelites ask for a king?

So all the elders of Israel gathered together and came to Samuel at Ramah. They said to him, “You are old, and your sons do not walk in your ways; now appoint a king to lead us, such as all the other nations have.” But when they said, “Give us a king to lead us,” this displeased Samuel; so he prayed to the LORD.

Did Ezra rebuild the walls of Jerusalem?

Artaxerxes commissions him to return to Jerusalem as governor, where he defies the opposition of Judah’s enemies on all sides—Samaritans, Ammonites, Arabs and Philistines—to rebuild the walls.

Who destroyed the city of Jerusalem?

The siege of Jerusalem in the year 70 CE was the decisive event of the First Jewish–Roman War, in which the Roman army captured the city of Jerusalem and destroyed both the city and its Temple.

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